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Tag Archives: wine writing

Wine trends in 2015

winetrends

wine trends in 2015Wine trends in 2015 will be similar to wine trends in 2014 — wine drinkers will see more wines they’ve never heard of and we’ll be able to buy those wines at more places than ever before, including and especially grocery stores. Along the way, Big Wine will continue to get bigger, and even wine writing could see significant changes, as those of us who don’t have money behind us will stop doing it.

More private labels. Retailers love private labels, like Trader Joe’s Two-buck Chuck or Costco’s Kirkland, because it gives them a product no one else has and because they make more money than with national brands. Case in point: The Total Wine chain sells many national brands at its cost, and makes its money on its Winery Direct private labels. We’ll see more private labels because retailers are desperate to boost margins at a time when they can’t, for whatever reason, raise prices. Nielsen reports (and I’m going to write more about this later this month) that private label wine sales were up 11 percent last year, compared to 3.5 percent for all wine.

More chains. There has never been a national wine retailer, which has made perfect sense given three-tier and that there are 50 booze laws for 50 states, including some that don’t allow chains. But these companies are expanding despite the legal obstacles. Total Wine expects to double its sales to $3 billion by 2019, opening 12 to 15 stores a year, and Canadian retailer Liquor Stores N.A. wants to add to stores and states to the 36 locations it has in Kentucky and Alaska. My guess? That the chains will slowly move into as many states as possible, changing the laws when necessary. Theu’ll offer better prices and force independents to get better, which is what happened in the pet business. Petco and PetSmart didn’t crush the independents when they opened 20 years ago; in fact, independents still account for about 90 percent of all pet stores, though only about one-third of sales.

More grocery stores selling wine. This will change the wine business as we know it, despite repeated failures to get grocery store sales in Pennsylvania and New York. Supermarkets want wine because it’s more expensive than most of what they sell, and it helps them offer one-stop shopping. Plus, they have the financial clout to change laws in states that forbid grocery store sales, most recently in Tennessee. Again, this will pressure independents, who won’t be able to compete on price and will have to redouble efforts to offer quality service.

Consolidation. Big Wine will continue to buy smaller companies and increase its market share, with deals like this. In this, it will solidify its hold on retailer shelves, making it more difficult for smaller wineries with limited distribution to be sold in all but the most progressive independents. I’d guess that as many as three-quarters of the wines in a typical grocery store come from the six biggest wine companies, and that percentage will only get bigger.

Internet wine writing shakeout. Last fall’s news that Vinous bought Stephen Tanzer’s International Wine Cellar is the biggest development in wine writing since the Internet. It means someone has figured out that the only way to make money with wine writing on the Internet is to target the five percent of Americans who buy wine that costs more than $20 and that the only way to target them is to get big to compete with the Wine Spectator and the Wine Advocate. That’s not good news for those of us who don’t target that audience and don’t have the deep pockets to get big. Think of it as the wine writing equivalent of what Big Wine is doing, and wonder how many independents who are on the Wine Web Power Index will be there in five years.

Seven years of wine writing on the Internet

winerant

wine writingThe Wine Curmudgeon has the best job in the world — I get to drink wine and write about it for a worldwide audience that appreciates what I say and regularly tells me so. I’ve won awards and I’m respected in a way I never was in my previous writing careers, and it’s not like I didn’t have successes then. How about interviewing a talking dog?

The catch? That writing about wine on the Internet is as financially unrewarding as it was when I started, which is the lesson for the blog’s seventh annual birthday week. The Internet isn’t interested in wine writing; rather, it rewards selling and marketing wine. More, after the jump:

Winebits 360: Birthday week edition

Birthday candles

Birthday weekA few notes after the past year of blog posts about cheap wine, wine education, and the wine business:

 • Operating system wars: Microsoft controls about 90 percent of the world’s computer operating system market with its various Windows products, but not on the blog. Just 52 percent of visitors over the past year used a Windows operating system to get here, and almost one-third of those had Windows XP installed — which died in April. Still, Windows was the most popular operating system, with Apple’s mobile iOS and desktop Macintosh tied for second at 16 percent. My beloved Linux was at 1.3 percent, good for seventh (and I think I know the other person who uses Linux to get here).

Picking a browser: Another surprise, given that the world’s most used browser is one of Microsoft’s Internet Explorers (warts and all) at about 55 percent of the world market. On the blog, though, Apple’s Safari (warts and all), is the top browser with 29 percent, with Explorer at 24 percent. Chrome and Firefox, the geek browsers of choice, were tied at around 19 percent.

Expensive wine: The best-read expensive wine post over the last year was for a Virginia wine, the Barboursville Octagon, which ran in August 2013. It was No. 115. In one respect, this isn’t surprising, since the blog isn’t about expensive wine. But that it did better than host of cheap wine posts, including the recent discussion about Spanish wine value, speaks to how popular Barboursville is in the world of regional wine.

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