Tag Archives: wine trends

The Wine Curmudgeon most popular posts 2015

wine curmudgeon

Change your logo as much as you want, but you’re still screwing up my site.

The Wine Curmudgeon blog has a new editor/publisher, but I knew nothing about it until I compiled the top 10 most popular posts from the past 12 months. It’s Google, which now decides what you read on the blog. I can try all I want — and I try very hard — to write relevant, informative, and helpful content, but my efforts matter less and less. That’s because Google directs people to the posts it decides are the most important, and for the first time in the blog’s history, those aren’t necessarily the posts I consider the most important.

Case in point: The top post from November 2014 to November 2015 was a five-year-old effort about Barefoot wine that didn’t make the top 10 last year. It’s bad enough that Google sent readers to the blog for something that wasn’t current, but the Barefoot post replaced the $10 Hall of Fame — my reason for being — as the most popular post.

Ain’t the Internet grand?

Almost none of the stuff that I wrote over the past 12 months that should have been in the top 20 was. None of the stuff that I thought was clever or funny made the top 20. Just old wine reviews — literally. Seven of the 10 best read posts over the last year were reviews of wines from 2014 or before.

This, for a writer, is as depressing as it gets, not unlike someone telling Michelangelo that the Sistine Chapel is nice, but an estimate for painting the house would be even better. What’s the point of reporting, and then crafting and sweating over a piece, when Google says not to bother because no one wants to read it? The search giant equates popularity with trust, so it sends people to the most popular posts because its algorithm says they’re the most trusted. Because, of course, they’re the most popular. That this is the Internet version of a Catch-22 doesn’t seem to matter.

Even the good news, that my traffic recovered in 2015 from the slump caused by Google’s ever-changing search methods and from revamping the website two years ago, was depressing. I’m getting more than 51,000 visitors — that’s visitors, not page views — a month, an amazing number for a one-person site. But what’s the point if they’re coming here to read stuff that doesn’t necessarily matter anymore?

Not to worry, though, if you like the stuff no one else does. I won’t change the blog’s format just because an algorithm says I should. Everyone should know me better than that by now. The most popular posts from 2015, plus a couple of other notes, are after the jump:

Four highlights from the 2015 American Wine Society conference


American Wine Society conferenceLast weekend’s American Wine Society conference reminded me that U.S. wine drinkers aren’t the stereotypes the wine business wants us to be. What a pleasure to be around curious, intelligent, and passionate wine drinkers for two days, people who want to learn more about wine and who are open to something that isn’t what they’re told they should drink.

Yes, it’s a small sample size, and yes, anyone who attends something like this isn’t going to be exactly typical. But when I mentioned the grocery store Great Wall of Wine in my first presentation, there was more than one nodding acknowledgment from the audience. Which means every wine drinker, no matter how experienced, faces many of the same problems.

Among the highlights:

• I took a lot of kidding when I offered to do a Texas wine seminar at an East Coast event, but it sold out almost immediately. The McPherson rose, the Llano Estacado Harvest tempranillo, and the Haak dry blanc du bois were the biggest hits, each speaking to Texas’ terroir and what happens when Texas winemakers make Texas wines. But that’s the point, isn’t it? That Texas wine will only grow and get better if the focus is on making Texas wine, and not California (or wherever) wine that comes from Texas.

• The other key from the Texas seminar? That people elsewhere seem eager to buy the wines, and that it’s time — if the grape harvests cooperate — to start exporting Texas wine to the rest of the U.S. The days when 95 percent of Texas wine was sold in Texas, and everyone was content with that, appear to be over.

• We aren’t scared of weird grapes, even though the wine business does its best to terrify us. That the hybrid blanc du bois impressed so many, with its clean citrus flavors, was one thing, but that the Augusta chambourcin was one of the hits of the regional wine seminar says even more. Chambourcin, a red hybrd, is notorious for its off, foxy aroma, but winemaker Tony Kooyumjian has solved that problem. This is probably the best chambourcin in the U.S., with spiciness, dark Rhone-style fruit, and a wonderful Missouri elan.

• The best wine that almost no one has ever tasted is the Edmunds St. John Bone-Jolly gamay from California’s Sierra Foothills. It seems so simple, but there is so much going on that it’s difficult to believe. Most winemaker tasting notes don’t say much, but Steve Edmunds is exactly right: “Juicy and precise on the palate, mouth-watering, showing lot of depth. The finish is long, and clean. This is already really versatile at the table, as always.” How much do I like it? It’s worth every penny of the $21 it costs.

Wine prices up, wine quality down in 2016?

wine prices

“$12? Didn’t that wine cost $10 last year?”

Don’t expect good news for wine prices or wine quality in 2016, and it’s more than my curmudgeonly cynicism saying so. The wine industry’s best price forecaster expects price increases next year, while a wine blogger who has been spot on about decreasing quality over the last couple of years sees more of the same.

Wine prices, says Rob McMillan of Silicon Valley Bank, will go up slightly next year, citing what looks to be a reduced harvest in California over the past three blockbusters, low gasoline prices, and producer optimism that they can raise prices. In addition, says McMillan, the numbers so far this year suggest that prices have been increasing, even though overall sales have been modest.

Interestingly, he doesn’t use the word premiumization to describe what’s going on, given that McMillan was one of the first people to identify the trend, that U.S. wine drinkers are trading up to more expensive wine. In fact, he seems almost surprised that prices will go up, given that “the the world’s economies are still struggling and our own [economy] isn’t setting any record.”

McMillan doesn’t define slightly, but my guess is that we’ll see as much as a dollar or so on a $15 bottle of wine, not that it will be that obvious. Those $9.99 wines will go up to $10.99, but there will various discounts, like case and club membership, to soften the blow. Plus, we’ll see even more new wines in the $12 to $15 category, as producers entice wine drinkers to spend a couple of bucks more for the same kind of wine they bought before.

As to quality, let me quote my pal Steve McIntosh at Winethropology. “The wine world is going to hell in a handbasket,” he emailed me, citing this post, in which he details (and it’s excruciating) how California winemakers are bastardizing wines that cost as much as $20 so they taste the way a focus group thinks they should taste.

In this, his post dovetails with what I’ve tasted over the past year, as producers focus on manipulation to push wines in the focus group direction and paying less attention to grape quality and varietal character in the process. This has been the case not just for wines from California, but from France, Spain, and Italy. A distributor friend, who has been in the business for 20 years, said he has seen wine quality go backwards, toward where it was in the late 1980s and early 1990s. In fact, so many wines have been so poorly made that I’m thinking about posting negative reviews, something I never thought would be necessary. But these wines are so dishonest that someone needs to call them on it.

I expect a wine to taste like wine, and not what Steve calls cough syrup. But apparently that’s too much to hope for these days.

Powered by WordPress | Designed by: suv | Thanks to toyota suv, infiniti suv and lexus suv