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Tag Archives: wine sales

“Our panel of experts:” Irony and non-winery wine clubs

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wine club expertsThird-party wine clubs — those that aren’t part of wineries — have always made the Wine Curmudgeon smile. How about the the website that rates wine clubs, and that also rates the wine clubs that the site operates? Or the wine club that offers “first-class” cabernet sauvignon from Spain, a concept that makes as much sense as coming here to find cult wine recommendations from Napa Valley.

Typically, most third-party wine clubs don’t tell you the wines you’re going to get or how they pick the wines you’re going to get. They trade on the group’s name, but are otherwise separate; hence a  newspaper wine club is a marketing tool that has nothing to do with the newspaper’s wine reporting. Mostly, there’s flowery language — “small-batch wines of real flair and value,” which means absolutely nothing when you try to parse it — and lots of promises about how good the wines are. Plus tasting notes, because all wine needs tasting notes, doesn’t it?

Which makes me wonder: Most of us wouldn’t buy shoes this way, sight unseen and trusting to someone else’s judgement. So why would we buy wine this way?

My newest smile is Global Wine Company, which runs the New York Times and Washington Post wine clubs plus those for retailer Williams-Sonoma, More and Food & Wine magazines, and celebrity chef Michael Mina. Check out the people who run the company — accountants and bankers, and a woman who helped make the PowerBar famous. There is no mention of the “panel of experts” who pick the wines, and about the only wine-related information I could find was this: “GWC handles all global wine sourcing, state compliance, and customer fulfillment, which enable partners to expand their brands into wine and drive recurring revenue.”

Mmmm, drive recurring revenue. How yummy does that sound?

Winebits 325: Corks, Mateus, wine sales

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Winebits 325: Corks, Mateus, wine sales

Everyone knows the cool kids only drink wine with corks.

When in doubt, a poll: The cork business announced last week that more than 9 out of 10 wine drinkers associate natural cork with higher quality wine. Which is about as surprising as the Wine Curmudgeon announcing that he wrote a book about cheap wine. We can question poll methodology, who paid for it (and the release is very vague about that), and the like, but none of that is as important as the way the results are phrased. It doesn’t say that wine closed with cork is “better.” It says: “Consumers associate higher quality wine with cork.” Of course they do. What else would we expect, given that most wine drinkers still make screwcap jokes? Even “experts” who are supposed to know about wine are still writing that junk. No wonder I’m so cranky so much of the time.

What happened to the bottle? Periodically, someone will announce they’ve re-marketing a Baby Boomer wine brand, figuring that people in their 50s and 60s will get a kick out of drinking the same wine they did when they were in their 20s. Mateus, which accounted for one-third of Portugal’s wine exports in the 1980s, is doing just that in the United Kingdom, releasing four new wines that are nothing like the rose the Boomers grew up. A Portugeuse zinfandel blend, anyone? Or a chardonnay and Maria Gomes blend? They’re spending £2 million (about US$3.3 million) on the effort, too, which seems like a lot of money for wine no one will be especially interested in.

Wine sales growth slows: And the reason may have been craft beer and flavored spirits, reports the Technomics consultancy. “The sluggish economy is creating ever more intense competition for adult beverage occasions,” says the report. “And today’s consumers — especially Millennials — have a broad drink portfolio that involves drink spirits, wine and beer, with flavor and occasion as key factors in the what-to-drink decision. Never before has the battle for share of glass been so intense.” Share of glass, indeed. The good news for wine, though growth was only 1.6 percent in 2013, is that total adult beverage volume declined 0.9 percent. Take that, beer.

What drives wine drinkers? Price, of course

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wine drinkers priceNot that the Wine Curmudgeon had any doubt. But listen to enough people in the business, and especially to the Winestream Media, and it’s scores and romance and tasting notes and about as much foolishness as you can imagine. But we have better evidence than ever that wine drinkers buy wine based on price, in the form of the 2013 Wine Market Council Study.

And what kind of wine do most of us buy, even those of us with deep pockets and subscriptions to the wine magazines? Cheap wine, of course.

More, after the jump:

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