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6 wines from San Francisco International Wine Competition

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san francisco wine competitionThese wines, which were gold or double gold winners at this year’s San Francisco International Wine Competition, show the strengths and weaknesses of wine competitions. It’s not that the wines are bad or didn’t deserve the medals  they got, but that the results speak to the perspective that the judges bring. In this case, three-quarters of the judges were from California, and many of the wines I tasted showed that perspective — pricey, fruity, and oaky, with lots of alcohol. How about a 15.1 percent tannat?

It’s this perspective that is overlooked when we debate the merits of wine competitions. How can a wine — technically well-made and delicious — do well if the judges don’t appreciate its style? The biggest problem I have when judging is being fair to the kinds of wines like those that won at the San Francisco competition. I find them difficult to enjoy and so mark them down. But at least I know I do this and make an effort. Hopefully, this idea of perspective is something that competition organizers take into account when they select judges.

Having said this, I tasted some terrific wines when the San Francisco wine competition did its Dallas road show last week (and the tannat, if not to my taste, was a wonder of winemaking skill). Check them out after the jump:

Wine of the week: Cave de Lugny La Côte Blanche 2013

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Cave de Lugny La Côte BlancheThe Wine Curmudgeon reviews a proportionally larger share of French wines, and when I look at the numbers — which I do because I don’t want to go too far in any direction — I always wonder if I should try to do fewer French wines. Then I taste something like the Cave de Lugny La Cote Blanche ($10, purchased, 12.5%), and I understand why I do so many cheap French wines.

They’re that good, and especially if they’re from Cave de Lugny, a cooperative in Burgundy that somehow produces affordable red, white, rose and sparkling wines from that very expensive region. Unfortunately, we don’t get enough of them over here, but the Les Charmes is a $10 chardonnay well worth drinking, and the $10 Macon-Villages chardonnay is equally delicious.

The Cote Blanche, which seems to be a World Market private label, is yet another terrific effort from Cave de Lugny. It’s chardonnay from the Macon area of Burgundy, so that means no oak. a mineral finish, and some apple and lemon fruit. But there is also an almost rich mouth feel, which makes the wine more interesting and is not easy to do for $10. It’s a step up from the previously mentioned Macon-Villages — and for the same price.

Highly recommended, and a candidate for the 2015 $10 Hall of Fame. Serve this chilled on its own, or with roast or grilled chicken. It would also do nicely as the wine to cook with and to drink in a dish like braised chicken with mustard and garlic (and I would add lots of sliced onions).

Winebits 357: Special Halloween edition

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halloween wineBecause the Wine Curmudgeon always gets a giggle when others try to turn Halloween into a wine holiday.

31 Halloween wines: Seriously? Indeed, says GreatWineNews. All of the usual wines are there, like Phantom and Ghost Pines, plus some I’ve never heard of and some that seem like a stretch, including a rose. And the writing, much of which seems to be a cut and paste job from winery sites, manages to find almost every cliche, Halloween and otherwise: “With a name like River of Skulls, you know it has to be good…”

Seriously, though: Food & Wine’s Ray Isle does one of the best jobs among the Winestream Media in making wine accessible and interesting, and makes the same attempt with this slideshow (let’s juice up those page views) for Halloween wine. It’s not a recent list, though difficult to tell how old it is, but the wines included are still adequate for drinking. Maybe it’s the way my mind works, but I’ve written about d’Arenberg’s The Dead Arm Shiraz several times over the past couple of years, and have never once thought of it in conjunction with Halloween.

Do it yourself: I am about the least handy person in the world; my greatest accomplishments in that regard are using a corkscrew and tightening door knobs. So anytime anyone can do something crafty, no matter how silly, I’m impressed. Karen Kravett, an Internet crafting type, shows how to turn wine bottles into Halloween decorations. Again, something else that never crossed my mind. 

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