Tag Archives: wine glasses

Winebits 384: Odd grapes, wine glasses, wine lawsuit


wine lawsuitOnly seven percent: Regular visitors here know the Wine Curmudgeon’s passion for odd grapes, and it’s good to know that I’m not the only one. By one estimate, eight grapes account for 93 percent of the annual harvest in California — chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon, zinfandel, merlot, pinot noir, syrah, sauvignon blanc, and cabernet franc. A group of winemakers, reports Marcy Gordon at Come for the Wine, wants to focus on the other seven percent, and is holding a couple of tastings this week to show off those grapes. This is most welcome news for those of us who care about diversity and variety in wine, as well as style and taste. That someone who makes wine isn’t intimidated by chenin blanc is some of the best news that wine drinkers can have.

The right way: Sommelier Stephanie Miskew writes about how to hold a wine glass correctly, which always makes me smile It’s about the only thing in wine that I’m a snob about; I can’t stand to see a wine glass held by the bowl, and when I see it in TV shows and movies I want to throw something at the screen. Miskew’s piece hits all the highlights, and it also gives me a chance to link to this: Wine Curmudgeon video, in which I demonstrate how to hold a wine glass.

Calling all lawyers: Wine’s legal experts are at it again, with a Champagne house suing a top California producer over the name of a wine. Lew Perdue at Wine Industry Insight has all of the wonderfully silly details about this wine lawsuit, including that the side are fighting over the name “Delice.” Imagine all of the time and money being spent on what seems to be a very ordinary, if not lousy, name for a wine. At least the Cristalino lawsuit was over a name that mattered.

Winebits 351: Wine glasses, wine laws, and economic growth


wine news wine glassesDo wine glasses matter? The answer is no, says the Vinepair website in a post that includes the sentence, “Any industry that marries the existence of experts, the spending of cash, and the words ‘acquired taste’ as exquisitely as the wine industry does is bound to intimidate the uninitiated.” Which was a guarantee the Wine Curmudgeon would write about it. The post dismisses the idea that different shapes matter — a Bordeaux glass, a Burgundy glass, and so forth — and cites several studies and zings Riedel, the big glass company, repeatedly. Most of which makes sense, since I’ve never been convinced spending $100 for a glass is going to make all that much difference. The difference comes, I think, in whether you use well-made glasses instead of poorly-made ones. I buy the Forte from Schott Zwiesel, about $10 a glass, and am content. That’s about the twice the price of Libbey glasses, but the expense seems worth it.

Hell no, we ain’t reformin’: Pennsylvania’s state-controlled liquor store system has been the subject of much controversy as well as repeated demands for privatization. Reform seems as far away as ever, despite all the effort, and I’ve discovered the reason: Money. The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board, which runs the stores, is a $2.24 billion business. Which is damned big — almost twice the annual sales of Crate & Barrel and only one-sixth the total of Whole Foods, even though the upscale grocer is a national company with more than 360 stores. How many state legislators, regardless of political persuasion, are going to throw away that much money? I’m not even sure I would.

Not just rich people drink wine: There’s a long and surprisingly boring post on Forbes discussing whether wine sales can predict economic growth. If someone can figure out what it actually says, let me know. As near as I can tell, it says that high-end wine sales are a predictor of U.S. economic health, which is not true and seems a silly thing for someone at Forbes to say. Because only five percent of the U.S. population buys wine that costs $20 or more, and the average price of a bottle of wine is about $10. So what the price of vineyard land in Napa Valley has to do with economic growth is beyond me. Which is probably why I do this and don’t write for Forbes.

Winebits 318: Wine glasses edition


Winebits 318: Wine glasses editionBecause, frankly, who knew there would be so much news about wine glasses?

Smaller glasses: Scotland’s government, as part of its campaign to urge what it calls more responsible drinking, wants the country’s bars and pubs to promote the sale of smaller measures of wine, including 125-milliliter servings. That’s about one-sixth of a bottle, or only twice as much as a tasting pour. The BBC, in its wonderfully BBC way, reports that the Scottish health minister said that “tackling Scotland’s difficult relationship with alcohol was one of the government’s key priorities.” Difficult relationship with alcohol, indeed. Isn’t that like being only a little pregnant? Either you drink too much or you don’t. In this country, the NeoDrys don’t hem and haw like that.

Riedel and Coke: Yes, the world’s premier wine glass manufacturer has devised a glass for the most insidious of beverages, Coca-Cola — at $20 each, no less. This raises all sorts of questions, starting with why: There is absolutely no reason for anyone to ever drink Coke, which has no nutritional value, no health value, rots your teeth, and is too sweet. Or not sweet enough, depending on your point of view. I write this as someone who gave up soft drinks when he started drinking wine, and I don’t miss the former at all.

No more glasses? A government in a leading New Zealand wine region wants to ban glassware from winery concerts and tasting events. Not surprisingly, this has the wineries furious. Producers in the Hawke’s Bay say using plastic cups instead of glasses would diminish the experience, and that wine in wine glasses makes wine more enjoyable. The ban is apparently part of a wider proposal to limit drinking in Hawke’s Bay that includes closing bars an hour earlier, from 3 a.m. to 2 a.m., and reducing the hours retailers can sell booze from 7 a.m.-11 p.m. to 9 a.m.-9 p.m.

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