Tag Archives: wine and health

Wine and sex

wine and sex

wine and sexThe Wine Curmudgeon, being a sort of academic these days, understands the need to publish, garner attention for your institution, and prove how wonderful you are. That’s the way the Ivory Tower works in the 21st century, and I’m more than willing to do my bit. But that still doesn’t excuse this kind of behavior — yet another wine and sex study showing that wine and sex make people happy.

This one comes from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, where researchers discovered that booze and sex rated highest on the study’s “pleasure scale,” beating out volunteering, religion, and childcare. Shocking news, I know.

To its credit, the study looks for legitimacy by noting that governments, faced with policy decisions, want to find out what makes its citizens happy. But even the most loopheaded government (do you hear me, Texas?) has to know that drinking and sex make people happy, while doing housework and being sick, which ranked low on the scale, don’t. So claiming public policy benefit isn’t quite what it seems.

Six years ago, I banned wine health news from the blog, after the infamous Italian study that revealed what every teenage boy has known for as long as there have been teenage boys: If you get a girl drunk, she is more likely to have sex with you, as the noted researcher William Shakespeare discussed. Apparently, little has changed in the wine and health world in those six years.

Finally, this study has been knocking around the cyber-ether for three years. That it showed up a couple of weeks ago when I was looking for something else speaks to the power of Google in determining what we find on the Internet, and that Google thinks we want stories about wine and sex. And yes, I have used the term wine and sex five times in this post to make Google happy; isn’t that what content providers are supposed to do?

Ain’t the Internet grand?

Welch’s grape juice hops on the wine bandwagon

welchs grape jucie wine

“Gorgeous and totally juicy. Jam and sweet spices burst from the glass in this deeply resonant, expressive bottling.”

Grape juice is good, wine is bad — accepted wisdom for generations. After all, there’s a reason there isn’t a minimum drinking age for grape juice.

Which is makes this TV commercial for Welch’s grape juice so damned odd. It compares grape juice to red wine, noting that the juice has some of wine’s health benefits: “We’re not so different after all.” This is mind-boggling, and not just because it runs counter to the current wave of anti-drinking propaganda. Rather, it positions wine in the mainstream (and it’s a juice company doing it, for good measure): Comparing wine, which no kid is supposed to drink, to something every kid in the U.S. has had.

“Considering that roughly half the adults in this country don’t drink alcohol, it makes a certain sense,” says Michael Wangbickler, CEO & Partner, Balzac Communications & Marketing. “Since it’s become common knowledge that drinking red wine is good for your heart, they’re making a play for those consumers who don’t drink wine but want its health benefits.”

This ties in with Welch’s 2014 goal to promote a health and nutrition, says Wangbickler. That anything to do with wine is part of that message should make all of us who drink it smile. Just like a little kid at breakfast with a glass of grape juice.

Video courtesy of iSpotTV.

Winebits 349: Wine ingredients, 60 Minutes, wine judging


wine ingredientsEwwwwww: The Wine Curmudgeon has long advocated ingredient labeling for wine, despite intense opposition from the industry (including many of my friends, who tell me I’m crazy). Still, as the blog’s travel and resort correspondent recently emailed me: “I was offered a glass of wine from a box, from which I happened to read the fine print. It says ‘ascorbic acid added as a preservative’ and there is something added called Allura Red Dye #40 for ‘color stabilization.’ This must be a killer wine because it has other cool stuff, too: pectins, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, esthers, benzoic acid, and keytones. I remember keytones from college – they’re a sort of hallucinogen, not unlike mushrooms. The only thing that is a little concerning is a warning that says ‘added catechins and other phenols may combine with aluminum, barium and cadminium creating benzaldehyde – a known carcinogen.’ But let’s not worry about that. Man, I can’t wait to try this stuff.”

The French Paradox: One reason why I’m here to write this, and you’re here to read it, is because the “60 Minutes” television program ran a story in November 1991 about why the French — who smoked, drank copious amounts of wine, and ate red meat — lived relatively long, healthy lives. The program concluded that the reason was red wine, and the U.S. wine boom — which is still going on — began at almost that moment. The International Food & Wine Society website has a short piece discussing the “60 Minutes” episode, with a clip. Can it really have been 23 years ago? Have wine’s health benefits really done a 180 since then?

Keep it in context: Dan Berger adds welcome perspective to the debate about wine judging with this article. Unfortunately, given the size of many competitions, judging is about pace almost as much as quality. That  means, Berger writes, that “the faster the evaluation, the more often showy wines take the spotlight. As a result, subtlety rarely is rewarded in today’s wine-tasting world.”

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