Quantcast

Tag Archives: Sicilian wine

Wine of the week: Lamura Bianco Organica 2014

wineofweek

lamura biancoOrganic and natural wines, despite powerful support, have never gotten much attention from consumers. For one thing, it’s difficult to tell the difference between organic and conventional wines, and especially when it comes to quality. Fortunately, the Lamura Bianco, a white from Sicily made with catarratto, has been a consistent organic value for years.

The Lamura Bianco ($10, purchased, 12.5%) is made with organic grapes (which is different from an organic wine); the 2014 vintage, despite its age, shows why Lamura delivers outstanding quality and value almost annually. Look for lemon and tropical fruit in a wine that is crisp and fresh, and with all of that topped off with the minerality one expects from a wine that will pair perfectly with seafood.

Highly recommended, and a candidate for the 2017 $10 Hall of Fame, with one caveat. Older vintages of the white (though not of the other Lamura, a red) don’t always age well, and can taste tired and worn out. I haven’t noticed a pattern to this, and it may be because the wine suffers during its Dallas supply chain experience. If that’s the case, then you won’t have a problem with it in other parts of the country.

Wine of the week: Colosi Sicilia Bianco 2013

wineofweek

Colosi Sicilia BiancoWhat better way to celebrate the blog’s eighth birthday than with a cheap Sicilian white wine made with three grapes no one has heard of? These are the days when it’s fun to be the Wine Curmudgeon.

The Colosi Sicilia Bianco ($10, purchased, 12%) is everything that I love about cheap wine, but that so many others don’t understand. It’s a light, simple, well-made, and refreshing wine, with green apple and lemon flavors, a bit of crispness in the back, and no oak. In this, it makes the point that sometimes all we need is a light, simple, well-made, and refreshing wine, whether to drink with dinner, to enjoy after work, or to sip on a weekend afternoon just because we want a glass of wine. Not every wine occasion has to be a big deal, and not every wine buying decision has to be as convoluted as purchasing a house.

The grapes, by the way, are inzolia, catarratto, and grillo (the latter of which I like almost as much as ugni blanc). Their combination gives the Colosi Sicilia Bianco a slightly chardonnay aroma, which is both surprising and not unwelcome. We don’t want U.S. wine consumers to be to turned off by a wine that has almost nothing in common with the stuff that Big Wine shovels at us in the grocery store, do we?

Wine of the week: Lamura Rosso 2013

wineofweek

Lamura RossoYears ago, before the hipsters discovered Sicily, Lamura was about the only Sicilian producer with any kind of distribution. And even Lamura hedged its bets, marketing the wine as organic as much as where it was from. Who knew about nero d’avola back then?

Still, the wine (as well as a Lamura white) was an excellent example of what Sicily could do. And nothing has changed since — the Lamura Rosso ($10, purchased, 13.2%), a red blend made with nero, remains focused on value and quality when so many others are more concerned with raising prices and making the wine taste like it came from some massive fruity and oaky barrel.

Look for cherry and black plum fruit (more than I expected, actually), but where the fruit is balanced by the Sicilian earthiness that I so enjoy. And, despite its age, the wine remains fresh and interesting, without any of the cloying fruit or ashy-tasting middle that shows up in red wines at this price.

Drink this on its own, and don’t be afraid to chill it slightly; it’s made for a warm summer days on the back porch And, of course, if you want to pair the Lamura Rosso, it will match with anything from burgers to bratwurst to red sauce.

Powered by WordPress | Designed by: suv | Thanks to toyota suv, infiniti suv and lexus suv