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Winebits 415: Pennsylvania, direct shipping, cheap wine

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PennsylvaniaMore obstacles: The Wine Curmudgeon has watched with glee and sympathy as Pennsylvania has tried to reform its state store system, where you can only buy wine from stores operated by the state. Some of it has been silly, like wine vending machines in grocery stores, and some of it points to how screwed up the political system is when it comes to liquor law in the 21st century. like state store reform held hostage in the state’s budget impasse. So we should not be surprised that spirits producers are threatening to hold their breath until they turn blue if the state allows wine to be sold outside of state stores but not liquor. Which means, I suppose, that state store reform is no closer today than in the past.

Personalized direct retail shipping? The VinePair website reports that the next big trend in wine shopping will be stores or services that send you wine that you want without you having to decide what you want; the trendy 21st term is “curated wine.” Which sounds nifty, but doesn’t take into account three-tier. That’s probably one reason why the post has to quote a retailer in New York City that offers the service, shipping to New York customers. Yes, this is a terrific idea, but it will never work in the U.S. unless the retailer can ship to all 50 states with a minimum of fuss, paperwork, and legal obstacles. Which, unfortunately, will probably not happen any time soon.

Blue collar wine: A tip o’ the WC’s fedora to Forbes’ Cathy Huyghe, who spent the month of November writing about the wine that most of us drink, and not Forbes’ one percenters. “…[I]t has turned out to be one of the most eye-opening projects I’ve ever done. … The longer I’m a wine writer, the further away it’s possible to get from the wines that most people drink.” Welcome to the fight, Cathy. The more wine writers who learn this, the better off wine will be. One of the biggest problems I have is convincing my colleagues that there is demand for serious criticism of what your articles call “Blue Collar” wine. 

Winebits 405: Legal affairs edition

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legal affairsBecause what fun would writing about wine be if we couldn’t write about lawsuits and other various legal affairs?

Aldi brings in the lawyers: It’s difficult for those of us in the U.S. to understand how touchy the British are about price comparison advertising and marketing for booze; hopefully, this bit about Aldi suing a retailer over price comparison will help explain. The discount retailer wants competitor Bargain Booze to stop the ads, which compare its products to Aldi’s with the tagline that they you can buy a brand name for the same price as Aldi’s private label. Plus, Aldi wants damages. I’d love to watch a bunch of barristers in wigs argue about this, but as much fun as it would be, the suit would have little chance of success in the U.S. That’s ironic, too, given that our booze laws, thanks to three-tier, are so much stricter than those in Britain.

Messing with Putin: Who knew that a geopolitical event like the Russian annexation of the Crimea would turn into a wine legal tussle? But it has, with Ukrainian prosecutors charging that the director of a winery in Russian-occupied Crimea opened a 240-year-old bottle for Russian President Vladimir Putin and former Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi. The Associated Press says that the two men illegally drank rare vintages from the Massandra winery, some worth tens of thousands of dollars, and that the winery director committed a crime by serving them the wine. Obviously, since the Russians control Crimea, nothing much will happen, but it’s another example of the power wine has over people. I wonder: did Putin and Berlusconi give the wines 95 points?

Only in Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania’s state store system has come in for its fair share of criticism, here and elsewhere, but this one is the best yet. A state resident illegally brought wine into the state, which means he likely bought it in New Jersey and drove it over the William Penn bridge, committing a crime in the process. As part of his settlement with the state, he had to forfeit about half of the 2,447 illegal bottles. Silly enough? It gets worse. As Bloomberg News Service’s Noah Feldman writes, the state will destroy the wine because a judge has ruled that it can’t be given to a hospital for fund-raising, since hospitals don’t use wine for medicinal purposes. Don’t worry if you’re confused here, since the entire episode — in keeping with Pennsylvania’s warped state store system — makes no sense. Just read the link and wonder at how this happens in the 21st century.

Winebits 327: Pennsylvania, wine prices, women winemakers

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Winebits 327: Pennsylvania, wine prices, women winemakersThe wine notes that usually appear on Tuesday are posting today because tomorrow is April 1 — and that’s time for the blog’s annual April Fools’ Day post.

More screwed up than ever: Pennsylvania has been trying to reform its horribly messed up state store system — where the state owns the liquor stores — since as long as I have been writing the blog. Nothing has been done, despite widespread political and consumer support, and the latest proposal shows just how corrupt the system is. Supermarkets would be able to sell wine under the proposed law, but only four bottles per customer per visit. Nevertheless, a spirits trade group immediately denounced the plan, claiming that those four bottles would give the wine business an unfair advantage, since spirit sales would still be limited to state stores. It’s almost impossible to understand what’s going on here, other than to note that this is just another example of the many failings of the three-tier system.

Britain’s wine pricing: Jamie Goode at the Wine Anorak has an excellent account of the wine pricing controversy in Britain, where most retailers substantially discount wine. And then don’t. And then discount it again. This must seem odd to those of us in the U.S., where discounting is accepted as a normal part of doing business, and where savvy consumers are eager to buy wine when it’s on sale. But British consumer advocates see this as nefarious — “[T]hese fake promotions are bad for wine, and a bad deal for customers, and I won’t stop talking about them until supermarkets do the right thing and stop them,” writes Goode — and have spent the past couple of years fighting the biggest retailers over the practice.

You’ve come a long way, baby: Jordan Salcito at The Daily Beast has discovered that women have broken through the glass ceiling and are now important winemakers. I’ll try not to be too cranky about this, but Salcito is about a decade late with this revelation. I wrote the same story for the American Airlines in-flight magazine in 2006, quoting many of the same women she quotes in her story. She also focuses on celebrity women winemakers, and misses the more important change, that Big Wine did most of the glass ceiling work, hiring women where they had never been hired before. Barefoot’s Jennifer Wall is responsible for 13 million cases of wine a year, which may make her the most important woman winemaker in the business. And her boss is Gina Gallo, whose company makes 80 million cases a year. Also, if Salcito doesn’t mind some writing advice, never, ever use a phrase like “pushing the envelope.” I expect more from the Beast.

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