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Tag Archives: Napa Valley

Expensive wine 64: Caymus Cabernet Sauvignon 2012

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Caymus cabernet sauvignon 2012The Wine Curmudgeon has a surprisingly long history with Caymus, considering how much its wines cost and that I don’t usually write about wines that cost that much. First, there was this, involving Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, as well as a big-time lunch last year when I tasted the 2003 Special Select, which someone mentioned sold for around $300 a bottle (assuming you could find it).

So I shouldn’t have been surprised when I was asked to participate in a Twitter tasting for the Caymus 2012 cabernet sauvignon ($60, sample, 14.6%), honoring the winery’s 40th anniversary. Which I agreed to do, and then had to cancel because I forgot I was judging the Critics Challenge that weekend and couldn’t do both.

Which would have been fun, because this is an intriguing wine — full of fruit and oak in a style I don’t usually like, but put together with such passion and honesty that even I can appreciate it. In fact, I tasted the wine with The Big Guy and L. Kleinpeter, and each was raving: “Intense.” “Well integrated.” “Rich and luscious.” And, perhaps the biggest compliment: Both would buy the Caymus, and these are two people who spend a lot of time drinking cheap wine with me.

The Caymus is very young, and the dark fruit (black cherry? blackberries?) practically jumps off the glass when you put your mouth over it, though it should age gracefully over the next couple of years. This is a wine loaded with sweet fruit, as these wines almost always are, but the fruit is part of the whole, and the tannins are fine and almost tasty, something that is not easy to do. In this, it is a wine that is exactly what people who appreciate Napa cabernet want, and done impeccably.

Winebits 335: Cheap wine, wine terms, and lots of wineries

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Winebits 335: Cheap wine, wine terms, and lots of wineriesHead to Target: The Wine Curmudgeon is always encouraged when the non-wine media does a cheap wine story, since that’s another step in the right direction — helping Americans figure out wine. If the Los Angeles Times’ recent story recommending wine to buy at Target included too much boring Big Wine (Clos du Bois chardonnay, really?), the story’s heart was in the right place. How can I be unhappy with anything that recommends Beaujolais? Though, and I mention this as a cranky ex-newspaperman who wants to help someone who apparently doesn’t do a lot of wine writing, mentioning Robert Parker in the blurb for Sterling cabernet sauvignon was counterproductive. Anyone who cares about Parker scores probably isn’t going to buy $10 cabernet at Target.

Stoned wine: Beppi Crosariol at the Toronto Globe & Mail answers a reader question about the wine term stony, complete with bad jokes. It’s actually a decent explanation, and includes a good description of minerality: “Flint, wet stone, chalk, limestone, slate, graphite – various rocky words get trotted out with increasing frequency today…” and he notes recent scientific findings that the grapes probably didn’t pick up these qualities from the soil.

How many wineries? The state of Texas, with 266,874 square miles, has about 300 wineries. Napa County, with 748 square miles, recently celebrated its 500th winery. This is a mind-boggling figure — there are more wineries in Napa than in all but two or three states (depending on whose figures you use). Is it any wonder that it’s the center of the U.S. wine universe, even for people who don’t know much about wine? Will we start hearing phrases like “carrying grapes to Napa?”

Expensive wine 30: Twomey Cellars Merlot 2005

Twomey-merlot-b
Yes, this seems like an odd choice for the Wine Curmudgeon, even for the expensive wine feature. It's a California merlot made, more or less, by the same people who make Silver Oak, which is a grape and a style of wine I'm not especially fond of. But, as I always insist, one should not judge the wine until after one tastes it.

And the Twomey ($40, sample) is very much worth tasting. I don't know that it's quite the French-style wine that the tasting notes say it is; it tastes very Napa Valley, though without many of the excesses that other wines of this kind have. How else do I know this? Many comments on CellarTracker for the Twomey are particularly vehement (and not fit for a family blog like this), criticizing the wine for not being big and over the top enough. There is even a plea for CellarTracker users to unite and overthrow the tyranny of wine critics, since the latter were so wrong about this wine. And, apparently, many retailers have been heavily discounting this vintage.

Otherwise, the Twomey features beautiful fruit made in the Silver Oak style — soft, rich and velvety. The longer the wine sits open, the more the parts come out, and the parts are impressive, mostly equal parts oak, chocolate, and red fruit. Let this sit for 20 or 30 minutes before you drink it, and pair with it with beef and anything with red wine sauces.

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