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wineofweek

Wine of the week: Shannon Ridge Wrangler Red 2012

There are a variety of red blends from California, usually older vintages from smaller wineries, that you won’t find unless you dig through the bottom  shelves at your local retailer. The Wine Read More »

wine closures

Winebits 392: Wine closures, cava, women winemakers

• Bring on the screwcaps: Mike Veseth at the Wine Economist offers one of the best analyses of the state of the wine closures, noting that the number of wineries that used Read More »

winetrends

Has the wine establishment turned its back on wine scores?

The Wine Curmudgeon writes stuff like this all the time: “Why the 100-point system of rating wine is irrelevant.” In fact, I write about the foolishness of wine scores so often that Read More »

winereview

Mini-reviews 74: White wines for summer

Reviews of wines that don’t need their own post, but are worth noting for one reason or another. Look for it on the final Friday of each month. This month, white wines Read More »

rests

Restaurant wine prices in Europe

The email from my friend visiting Spain not only waxed poetic about the wine, but about the prices: “Talk about cheap wine. Beautiful wine for €12, and the most expensive bottle was Read More »

Father’s Day wine 2015

Fathers-Day-slider

Father's day wine 2015The Wine Curmudgeon got a bunch of emails over the past couple of weeks extolling various studies about what dads want for Father’s Day, who buys dad his Father’s Day present, and the most common Google searches for Father’s Day gifts. Most of which was a lot of effort for nothing, because everyone here knows that Father’s Day wine 2015 is the ultimate gift.

Keep the blog’s wine gift-giving guidelines in mind throughout the process: “Don’t buy someone wine that you think they should like; buy them what they will like.”

Suggestions for Father’s Day wine 2015:

Tintonegro Malbec Uco Valley 2012 ($14, sample, 14%): Know how too much Argentine malbec tastes like dark-flavored grape juice? Not this one, which was among the highlights of my El Centro wine class tastings. Look for dark fruit and more freshness than I thought possible in a malbec. Highly recommended (steaks on the grill), and a steal at this price.

Jolie Folle Rose 2014 ($10/1-liter bottle, purchased, 12.5%): The ultimate porch rose, in that this French pink wine is simple enough (sort of lemony-cranberry fruit) to be enjoyable and offers a couple of extra glasses because of the bigger bottle at the smaller bottle price.

Cruz de Piedra Blanco 2014 ($9, purchased, 13%): I suppose there are some crappy cheap Spanish wines to be found, but I’ve yet to find one yet. This white, made with macabeo, usually useed for cava, offers some of the Spanish bubbly’s fruit flavor (lemony-apple?) and a wonderful freshness — and somehow, once, got 86 points from the Wine Spectator. Serve chilled on its own or with any grilled seafood or even brats.

Los Dos 2013 ($8, purchased, 14%): This Spanish red blend, with garnacha and syrah, never fails to amaze me, and this vintage is even better than the 2012 (which was terrific). Lots of red fruit from the garnacha, and the syrah adds some heft and balance.

More about Father’s Day wine:
Father’s Day wine 2014
Father’s Day wine 2013
Wine of the week: Josep Masachs Resso 2013
Expensive wine 73: Pierre-Marie Chermette Fleurie Poncié 2013

 

Wine of the week: Kon Tiki Merlot 2014

wineofweek

kon tiki merlotMichael Franz, who judged the flight of $15 and under merlots at the Critics Challenge with me last month, was even less optimistic abut finding quality wine among the nine entries than I was. And regular visitors here know how the Wine Curmudgeon feels about $10 grocery store merlot.

So if Michael was happy, then you know the wine was worth drinking. We gave six medals, including a platinum to the Chilean Kon Toki merlot ($12, sample, 13.2%) — easily one of the best grocery store merlots I’ve had in years. It tasted like merlot and not a chocolate cherry cocktail, with almost unheard of depth and subtlety. Look for a black currant aroma followed by black fruit and very correct tannins that weren’t harsh or off, but complemented the fruit.

This is the kind of wine to buy by the case and keep around the house when you want a glass of red wine that does what red wine is supposed to do, and that doesn’t offend you with too much fruit, bitterness, or oak. Drink it on its own, or with any weeknight red wine dinner, from meat loaf to takeout pizza. Dad probably wouldn’t mind a bottle, either, if he needs something for Father’s Day.

Highly recommended, and a candidate for the $10 Wine Hall of Fame if I can find it for that price. The only catch? The importer lists distributors in 33 states and the District of Columbia, but many of them are small and may not have enough clout to get the wine on store shelves.

Winebits 390: Restaurant wine, retailing, consolidation

winenews

Restaurant wineLess and less: The share of wine that consumers buy in restaurants, compared to what they buy in stores, has fallen by some 10 percent since the start of the recession, according to figures compiled by Beverage Information Group. In 2014, restaurants accounted for 42.2 percent of all wine sales as measured in dollars, down from 47 percent in 2008. By itself, this isn’t doesn’t necessarily mean that restaurant wine is becoming increasingly irrelevant, given that the recession was so long and so powerful. But given the recovery in the retail side of the wine business, it’s another indication that consumers, fed up with the poor quality and high prices on so many restaurant wine lists, aren’t buying wine anymore. It also speaks to what might be a significant change in consumer dining habits, that they’re eating at home more often and buying wine when they do.

Honesty is the best policy: Shocking news, but a British on-line retailer says too many of his competitors artificially inflate their prices so they can offer lower “angel” discounts on wines that consumers can’t buy anywhere else, leaving the consumer with overpriced, lower quality wine. It would be better, says the managing director of WineTrust, to price honestly, the way his company does it. This is a not a problem unique to Britain, as anyone who has ever tried to understand U.S. grocery store pricing knows, but it is interesting that a retailer is calling out other companies for the practice. I can’t imagine that ever happening in the U.S., where price confusion is a key part of retailing.

Getting even bigger: This is how crazy consolidation in the wine business is becoming. A buyout specialist is apparently thinking about taking over Diageo, the British  wine, beer, and spirits company, in a deal worth more than $70 billion. To put that number in perspective, 170 countries have a smaller gross domestic product. Diageo, though wine is the smallest part of its business, is still among the top dozen or so biggest U.S. producers, with brands that include Rosenblum, Sterling, and Dom Perignon. There’s substantial doubt whether a deal gets done, not least because it’s so expensive. But that anyone is even considering it points to the mania for consolidation in the world today.

 

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