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wineadvice

Update: Wine for your wedding

The wedding planning cycle begins anew this month, and the Wine Curmudgeon is here to help. Check out the blog’s wine for your wedding post, featuring the legendary Mr. Sommelier. And remember, Read More »

Wine writing, and what's wrong with it

Great quotes in wine history: Humphery Bogart

Humphrey Bogart’s reaction after he finds out that Peter Lorre told Mary Astor that scores are the best way to buy wine. A tip o’ the Wine Curmudgeon’s fedora to the Dedoimedo Read More »

wineofweek

Wine of the week: Carmel SelecteD Sauvignon Blanc 2013

Israeli wine has a long and mostly obscure history; if it’s known at all, it’s for kosher wine, which has not traditionally been something one wants to be known for. The Israelis Read More »

winenews

Winebits 341: The Neo-Prohibitionists’ new study

A roundup of the recent news from the Centers for Disease Control that excessive drinking is killing 1 in 10 working-age Americans, another scientific study in the Neo-Prohibitionist effort to stop us Read More »

winetrends

The Wine Curmudgeon visits The Reverse Wine Snob

Jon Thorsen is one of the hottest wine writers in the world these days, showing up on all sorts of most influential lists, as a Wine Blog Awards finalist, and with a Read More »

Winebits 341: The Neo-Prohibitionists’ new study

winenews

Neo-Prohibitionist studyA roundup of the recent news from the Centers for Disease Control that excessive drinking is killing 1 in 10 working-age Americans, another scientific study in the Neo-Prohibitionist effort to stop us from drinking by scaring us to death. And where no one bothered to check this out:

NPR’s sobering picture: The bad pun is there because, believe it or not, someone working for a major U.S. news outlet used the pun in the story. The report, written by Nancy Shute, says 1 in 6 of us binge drink, but doesn’t question one of the study’s definitions of excessive drinking: eight drinks a week for women and 15 for men. Which implies that most core wine drinkers in the U.S. are binging, including the Wine Curmudgeon. So why is two glasses of wine with dinner excessive? I expect more from NPR, which usually does better reporting than its competitors and doesn’t accept on faith whatever the government says.

Got to have charts:The Washington Post’s Lenny Bernstein seemed quite surprised at the statistics in the study, including what he called “the eye-opening charts included in the report.” Maybe. But there were almost 15,000 homicides in the U.S. in 2012, according to the FBI, while the CDC attributed about half of those to excessive drinking. That difference is what’s eye-opening to me: That about the same number of us killed someone and weren’t drunk when we did it. Does this mean we need to regulate sobriety?

Get rid of booze, get rid of the problem: The solution to all of this? “.. [I]ncreasing alcohol taxes, regulating alcohol outlet density, and avoiding further privatization of alcohol retail sales.” Which, of course, is exactly the aim of the NeoDrys — regulate drinking by making it more expensive, reducing the number of places where we can buy it, and keeping government involved in selling it, as in Pennsylvania. This is instead of outlawing drinking, which didn’t work the last time. That education, and not regulation is the answer seems to be beyond their understanding. Perhaps someone can explain why Pennsylvania, with some of the most restrictive liquor laws in the country, had the same death rate as Illinois, where you can buy scotch at the drug store, or Louisiana, where drinking is a tourist industry?

The Wine Curmudgeon visits The Reverse Wine Snob

winetrends

reverse wine snobJon Thorsen is one of the hottest wine writers in the world these days, showing up on all sorts of most influential lists, as a Wine Blog Awards finalist, and with a book deal (out next year).

What makes it even more impressive is that Jon writes about cheap wine as The Reverse Wine Snob.

We don’t approach the subject in the exact same way (his top price is $20), but our points are the same: You don’t have to spend a lot of money to buy a quality bottle of wine. Jon was kind of enough to let me write something for his blog today, and we’re giving away a couple of cheap wine books as part of my guest post:

[W]riters like Jon are pitching in, helping to educate wine drinkers and to disabuse them of the notion that wine is elitist and snooty. Trust me: That was not something a lot people wanted to do in the bad old days, when they would have turned their noses up at anyone who featured wines sold at retailers like Costco and Trader Joe’s. That just wasn’t done.

You’ll have to visit Jon’s website to read the rest. But it’s OK. That’s the point of this exercise.

When I started writing about cheap wine in those long ago days of the 20th century, the Winestream Media was so entrenched that Elin McCoy wrote a book about Robert Parker called “The Emperor of Wine,” and cheap wine got as much respect as a social disease.  How that has changed — so much so that I actually smile when I think about it. Who would have thought that was possible?

Fourth of July 2014

fireworks

The blog is mostly off today for the holiday, but will return on Monday with our usual features, including the cheap wine book giveaway with Jon Thorsen, the Reverse Wine Snob. Enjoy July 4, and especially this video — Linda Ronstadt, Emmylou Harris, and Dolly Parton from the incredible Trio II, singing “High Sierra” (courtesy of jpspanishfan2 at YouTube). Harmony doesn’t get much better than this.

And you don’t have to be of a certain age to understand what music lost when Ronstadt, who has Parkinson’s, realized she couldn’t sing anymore.

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