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Category Archives: Wine trends

Who has the best job in wine?

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best job in wine

And I don’t even have to wear a tie.

The Wine Curmudgeon, of course. I drink wine and tell people what it tastes like. How much better does any job — in wine or otherwise — get than that?

Which is why I was surprised to see this, “10 of the world’s best jobs in wine,” from the British trade magazine, The Drinks Business. Wine writing was only fourth, and while it was rated ahead of vineyard worker at No. 6 (No. 6? obviously written by someone who has never picked grapes on a 100-degree day for minimum wage or piecework), it was outranked by cellar manager, vineyard owner, and winemaker.

The rest of the list: 10, sommelier; 9, airline wine consultant; 8, wine brand owner; 7, tasting room manager; and 5, wine shop owner.

Of those that rank ahead of writing, I can understand winemaker, given that’s the whole point of wine. But vineyard owner? That’s farming, which combines the joy of picking grapes with the delight of exchanging spreadsheets with bankers, all the while staring at the sky and cursing the weather. And cellar manager? Consider these duties: Hiring people to work in the winery’s cellar and maintaining equipment. Hiring is bad enough, but maintaining equipment? Talk about chalk on a blackboard.

This is not meant as a criticism of any of these jobs, and anyone who enjoys them and does them well has my respect and admiration. Rather, it’s to note that I fully appreciate my good fortune in doing what I do. Yes, it’s sometimes work, whether grinding out a blog post when my brain is somewhere else, or tasting my way through a couple of dozen wines that not only taste the same, but are as stupid as a TV reality show. But it’s not working in a coal mine or behind the broiler at Burger King; I’m indoors, people respect my opinion, and I get to taste some tremendous wine. How much luckier can one person be?

Image courtesy of Vinography, using a Creative Commons license

Another study agrees: We buy wine on price

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wine genome studyThe biggest surprise in the Wine Genome study from Constellation Brands, one of the biggest wine companies in the world? That one-fifth of us buy wine on price.

“We knew they were out there, but the widening span of the study showed how deeply the recession cut,” said Dale Stratton, the Constellation official who oversaw this version, the third, of the company’s Project Genome, designed to identify the most common types of of wine drinkers based on purchase behavior, motivation, and preferences. “The recession had a big impact and significantly changed consumer spending habits.”

Stratton laughed when I asked him about this. No, he said, it’s not that Constellation (whose brands include Rex Goliath, Mark West, and Robert Mondavi) didn’t expect price to be important. Rather, it’s that price-driven wine drinkers were the biggest category of the six, doubling the number of  Enthusiasts — those who “love everything about the wine experience,” including researching purchases, reading reviews, and sharing wine with others. In other words, the Winestream Media’s audience. The other thing to note here? The Enthusiasts account for 15 percent of profit, compared to 14 percent for the Price-Driven group. Harrumph.

The study, which updated a 2004 effort, is full of surprises — unless, of course, you visit here regularly (and you can see a nifty infographic describing each group here):

• The third-biggest group, at 19 percent, are Overwhelmed, which means pretty much what it says: “I don’t enjoy shopping for wine, and find it complex and overwhelming. This, says Stratton, reinforces the need for wine education, not only for consumers but for those who sell wine — distributors, retailers, and restaurateurs. Hearing this was surprising enough, but I almost dropped the phone when Stratton said that winespeak is one of the reasons the overwhelmed are overwhelmed. Maybe, he said, retailers and wine writers should find simpler terms to use.

• Women, who have traditionally skewed higher for wine purchases at the lower end, are becoming more important at the higher end. The Enthusiasts, who were about 65 percent male in 2004, were close to 50-50 this time. “This means more women see wine as a hobby,” says Stratton, and that means more women attend tastings and shop at wine-specific retailers.

• Wine snobs, called Image Seekers, are still with us, and in a big way. They account for 18 percent of wine drinkers, but contribute 26 percent of profits, more than any other group. Given the wine they drink, that’s probably not surprising.

• Welcome the Millennials to wine, in the form of the Engaged Newcomer at 12 percent. This group is young, wants to learn more, and recognizes that wine is intimidating. They also spend more on a bottle than the other groups, about $13.

One other point worth noting: This kind of study is common for consumer packaged goods like laundry detergent and ketchup. That Constellation can do for wine what Proctor & Gamble does for its products speaks volumes about how much the wine business has changed, and that it is becoming more mainstream.

“Wine is increasing household penetration at a good clip, and the audience has broadened,” said Stratton. “And it’s going to continue to change, as the American population changes.”

Wine sales, price, and what doesn’t get enough attention

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wine sales priceRegular visitors here know that cheap wine outsells expensive wine in the U.S., and that the Winestream Media spends most of its time genuflecting about wine that most of us don’t buy. And when I say most of us, I really, really mean most of us, thanks to these two charts totaling U.S. retail wine sales — expensive and overall — from wine industry trade magazine Wines & Vines. Here are the charts — overall and and expensive.

Several caveats: The charts don’t match on dates; expensive wine covers the 52 weeks ending June 2014, while the other chart is June 2012 to June 2013. This probably helps pricey wine, since its business picked up substantially over the last year. Also, since these are retail-only numbers, expensive wines that focus on restaurants are almost certainly under-counted. Finally, since the number of cases sold for the less expensive wines isn’t on the chart, I used third-party sources in the discussion below where necessary.

Still, the numbers are stunning:

 • The best-selling expensive wine (more than $20 a bottle) was Santa Margherita, with 147,925 cases and $36.5 million in sales. The best-selling wine overall was Barefoot, with $323 million and some 11 million cases. How big is that disparity? In grocery stores, it’s the difference between Kroger, a national chain, and Save Mart, a company only people in certain parts of California have heard of.

• The 15th- through 20th-ranked expensive producers all had $4 million or less in annual retail sales. It’s not so much that those totals are two-thirds of what Barefoot sells each week, but that I have a friend who owns a Dallas magazine company whose annual sales are $2 million. You’d think high-end, well-known pricey brands would be doing exponentially better than someone with a one-city media company.

• Menage a Trois, 16th on the overall list, doubled the dollar sales for Santa Margherita, and every producer on the overall list sold at least one-third more than Santa Margherita.

• Only two brands on the overall list, which tracks retail wine sales, cost more than $10 a bottle, and one of them, Kendall-Jackson, was at $12.

Hence anyone who doesn’t believe that only five percent of U.S. wine drinkers buy wine that costs $20 or more hasn’t been paying attention.

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