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Category Archives: Rose wine

Memorial Day and rose 2015

Memorial Day and rose 2012

rose 2015The blog’s eighth annual rose post, which runs every year at the traditional start of summer, is notable for two reasons. First, it may well be the only place on the Internet that has consistently advocated for rose in the last decade, and, second, because of all the wines we’ve talked about. Dare I say that the combined posts are among the most comprehensive list of cheap, well-made, and value-oriented roses in the cyber-ether?

The Wine Curmudgeon, being the humble sort of fellow that he is, will let you decide that. The links at the bottom of this post will take you to many of the past recommendations, while the blog’s rose category offers even more reviews from the past eight years. The blog’s rose primer discusses styles, why rose is dry, and how it gets its pink color, and which vintages to buy. Note that some producers, who still don’t understand that we want dry rose instead of sweet pink wine, are calling their sweet pink wine rose to confuse us. The giveaway? Terms like silky and smooth on the back label. Rose should be crisp.

This year’s suggestions are below, but they’re only a start. As I wrote last year, “It’s almost impossible to find a badly made $10 rose.”

Fattoria La Valentina Cerasuolo d’Abruzzo 2013 ($11, purchased, 12.5%): Solid, if fruity, Italian rose with lots of strawberry, no doubt from the montepulciano d’abruzzo grape used to make the wine. Think of it as the pink wine equivalent of the red wine made in the same region frm the same grape, which usually offers quality and value.

Goats do Roam Rose 2014 ($8, purchased, 13.5%): Another in a long series of solid, fruity, value-driven rose from this South African producer. It has gamay this year, the same grape used in Beaujolais in France, which gives the wine more fruit (strawberry?) than you would expect.

Yalumba Y Series Rose 2013 ($10, purchased, 12%): Australia’s Yalumba always does a fine job with rose, and this no exception. It’s made with sangiovese, and offers soft red fruit balanced by cranberry and an apple peel sort of finish. Always one of my favorites.

Los Vascos Rose 2014 ($10, sample, 13.5%): This Chilean rose, owned by France’s Rothschild family, has had its ups and downs. But this vintage, made with cabernet sauvignon, is structured, fresh, and features dark red fruit. There is even some tannin, which adds interesting balance.

More about Memorial Day and rose:
Memorial Day and rose 2014
Memorial Day and rose 2013
Memorial Day and rose 2012
My lunch with Provence
$100 of wine

Winebits 386: Rose wine edition

winenews

Rose wine We mark the blog’s eighth annual rose week with these notes about rose from around the Internet:

Nine recommendations: And nine solid recommendations as well, from Laurie Daniel at the San Jose Mercury-News. Among her choices are so the blog’s favorites, including Bonny Doon, Pedroncelli, and Muga. As Laurie, who I’ve judged with and who has a fine palate, notes, there is no reason to spend a lot of money on rose. That’s not the point of it.

Restaurant choices: The Boston Herald has a piece by one of the city’s restaurant types touting his locations’ roses, and one of them is a $10 rose from blog favorite Sascha Lachine that I haven’t been able to find in this part of the country. Lachine’s Single Blend Rose follows through on his other value wines, offering lots of quality (strawberry fruit) for not much money.

Even the glasses: How do we know, as has been widely reported over the past year, that rose has finally been accepted by mainstream wine drinkers? Riedel has developed a pricey glass for it. Acceptance in the wine business doesn’t get more accepting than that. Of course, it begs the question of why a wine that rarely costs more than $10 needs a $69 glass, but I’m just happy there is a Riedel rose glass. Pink wine, no matter how hard the snobs try, is something they can’t take away from us.

Wine of the week: Robert Hall Rose de Robles 2013

wineofweek

robert hall rose de roblesOne of the best winemakers too many people have not heard of is Robert Hall’s Don Brady. The Wine Curmudgeon has waxed poetic about his work many times, that Brady is able to make interesting, terroir-driven, value-worthy wines in California’s Paso Robles when so many others there go for scores, an excess of fruit, sticker shock, and too much alcohol.

The current version of the rose ($11, purchased, 13%) is a case in point. It’s a blend, including grenache and cinsault, and has a little more strawberry fruit this year than last, so it isn’t as lean or as mouthwatering as in previous vintages. But that’s not a bad thing, for it reflects Paso Robles, which is warmer and produces richer, fruitier wines. And this is a rich, comforting rose that is still low in alcohol. How many others can make that claim?

Highly recommended, not just for summer porch sipping, but as a food wine — hamburgers, smoked chicken, and pulled pork (for the au courant among the blog’s visitors).

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