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Category Archives: Podcasts

Winecast 14: John Concannon, Concannon Vineyards

John Concannon is the fourth generation of his family to work for the family business, which is saying something in California. And though Concannon is today owned by The Wine Group (which also controls Big House and Glen Ellen, among many others), John and his father, Jim, are still involved in the day-to-day operations of the 127-year-old winery.

Concannon is known for several things, not the least of which is petite sirah. It pioneered the grape in California, and still makes some of the most interesting petite sirahs in the U.S. John and I talked about the state of the wine business, what consumers are looking for in terms of value, and the history of petite sirah at Concannon.

To download or stream the podcast, click here. It's about 9.9 megabytes and 11 minutes long.

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Robin Goldstein and The Wine Trials 2010, part II

Robin Goldstein knows even more about cheap wine than the Wine Curmudgeon, which is saying something. But what else would one expect from the co-author and guiding force of The Wine Trials 2010 (Fearless Media, $14.95), perhaps the best guide to wine that costs less than $15 a bottle?

The second edition has just been published, and it's another fine
effort. I chatted with Goldstein via Skype (the unofficial Internet phone service of the Wine Curmudgeon) but technical glitches on my part prevented running it as a podcast. Instead, it's a transcript of our interview. In part II today, Goldstein talks about some of the wines that made the book, as well as wine labels and wine names. In part I, which ran Thursday, we talked about the trends in cheap wine and why there is more good, cheap wine than ever before.

Robin Goldstein and The Wine Trials 2010, part I

Robin Goldstein knows even more about cheap wine than the Wine Curmudgeon, which is saying something. But what else would one expect from the co-author and guiding force of The Wine Trials 2010 (Fearless Media, $14.95), perhaps the best guide to wine that costs less than $15 a bottle?

The second edition has just been published, and it's another fine effort. I don't know that I agree with each of the 150 wines in the book (I've tasted all but 25 or so); many simple, fruity wines did better than they should have. But that's nit-picking, because Goldstein's concept is sound. Price is not the be all and end all the experts want us to think it is. Blind tasting, without the influence exerted by price and ratings, matters.

I chatted with Goldstein via Skype (the unofficial Internet phone service of the Wine Curmudgeon) and was going to run this as a podcast. But there were some technical glitches on my end, so it's a transcript of our interview. Part I looks at the trends in cheap wine and why there is more good, cheap wine than ever before. Part II, which posted Friday, looks at some of the wines that made the book, as well as wine labels and wine names.

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