Category Archives: Italian wine

Wine of the week: Lamura Rosso 2013


Lamura RossoYears ago, before the hipsters discovered Sicily, Lamura was about the only Sicilian producer with any kind of distribution. And even Lamura hedged its bets, marketing the wine as organic as much as where it was from. Who knew about nero d’avola back then?

Still, the wine (as well as a Lamura white) was an excellent example of what Sicily could do. And nothing has changed since — the Lamura Rosso ($10, purchased, 13.2%), a red blend made with nero, remains focused on value and quality when so many others are more concerned with raising prices and making the wine taste like it came from some massive fruity and oaky barrel.

Look for cherry and black plum fruit (more than I expected, actually), but where the fruit is balanced by the Sicilian earthiness that I so enjoy. And, despite its age, the wine remains fresh and interesting, without any of the cloying fruit or ashy-tasting middle that shows up in red wines at this price.

Drink this on its own, and don’t be afraid to chill it slightly; it’s made for a warm summer days on the back porch And, of course, if you want to pair the Lamura Rosso, it will match with anything from burgers to bratwurst to red sauce.

Wine of the week: Caposaldo Chianti 2012


Caposaldo ChiantiWho thought the Wine Curmudgeon would ever have anything nice to say about an Italian wine made with merlot? But that was before I tasted the Caposaldi Chianti.

This Italian red from the Chianti region in Tuscany is a brilliant example of traditional Italian style combined with modern winemaking techniques. The Caposaldi ($10, purchased, 12.5%) is dark, earthy, funky, and full of delicious sour cherry fruit, yet it isn’t too heavy or too harsh in that old-fashioned and not missed way. And much of that is because it’s a blend, with the traditional sangiovese complemented with 10 percent cabernet sauvignon, 10 percent merlot and 5 percent malvasia, a white grape. The cabernet adds some heft, the merlot adds freshness to the fruit, and the malvasia softens the sangiovese. The result is amazing.

In one respect, this isn’t new, since blended Chianti, even with white grapes, has been allowed for decades. But this style of blend takes a different approach from those who use the cabernet and merlot to make a wine more New World in style — fruitier and less dark. Here, though, the two grapes reinforce the Caposaldo Chianti’s Italianness. This makes it perfect for any food that has pork, tomato sauce, beef, noodles, cheese, or any combination thereof.

Highly recommended, and a candidate for the 2016 $10 Hall of Fame — another example of what a winemaker who wants to offer the best value can do when value and quality are what matter most.

Wine of the week: Cusumano Insolia 2012


Cusumano InsoliaThe Wine Curmudgeon, for all the chips on his shoulder, is always wiling to admit when he’s wrong. Hence another mea culpa for Cusumano, the Sicilian producer whose qualities I have doubted, and this time for its Inosolia white wine.

The Cusumano Insolia ($11, purchased, 12.5%) is made with the insolia grape, native to Sicily and mostly used to make marsala until the Sicilian wine revolution of the past decade. This is an unusual white grape, even for Sicily, and I’m not sure there’s a white quite like it anywhere else in the world — almost tannic, but also softer than chardonnay and crisper than viognier.

This vintage, which is apparently current despite its age, isn’t as long in the finish as when it was younger, but it still shows why Cusumano is one of the best producers on the island. Look for the qualities that make me so excited about Sicilian white wine — melon fruit, white pepper, an herbal aroma, and all in balance for a very fair price.

Drink this chilled, and pair it with grilled fish or chicken finished with olive oil and herbs. In this, one more reason why we don’t need to drink badly made chardonnay.

Powered by WordPress | Designed by: suv | Thanks to toyota suv, infiniti suv and lexus suv