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Category Archives: Expensive wine

Expensive wine 66: Guffens-Heynen Pouilly-Fuissé Tri des 25 ans 2005

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Guffens-Heynen Pouilly-Fuissé Tri des 25 ans 2005Great wines have great stories to go with them, even if the stories can be embarrassing. Such is the case with the Guffens ($80, purchased, 13%), although the story isn’t about the wine as it is the people involved.

Jay Biletti has been a long-time supporter of Drink Local Wine and an advocate for Arizona wine. I’ve judged with him many times, and he is a smart wine guy who is always fun to taste with. Several years ago, when Jay and I were judging the late Southwestern Wine Competition, we ordered a bottle of white Burgundy. It tasted and smelled quite funky. “It’s corked,” said Jay, who could plainly smell wet dogs and damp basements. “Oh no,” I said. “It’s just funky. White Burgundy can do that.” We went around with this for a bit, and Jay almost believed me. So we asked Diane Teitelbaum, whose wine knowledge is immeasurable and who was eating dinner with us. She took one whiff, and gave me a firm look. “Of course it’s corked, Jeff. What were you thinking?”

Hence the Guffens, which Jay brought to dinner in honor of that night when he was in Dallas this summer. Which was not corked. Really. It’s classic white Burgundy (chardonnay from the Burgundy region of France, in this case the Pouilly-Fuissé part of Burgundy). It’s still very young, and won’t reach its peak for at least another couple of years. The fruit (apple-ish?) is way in the back, and you’ll taste more white pepper and minerality than anything else. The oak is hovering over all, in exactly the way oak should hover.

Jay and I enjoyed the wine, and he was very nice when we told the corked story to the other guests. They didn’t even laugh too hard.

Expensive wine 65: Alain Hudelot-Noellat Chambolle-Musigny 2003

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Alain Hudelot-Noellat Chambolle-MusignyThe Wine Curmudgeon long ago accepted the fact he would never get to taste most of the world’s great wines. Even if I could afford them, what with prices like $500 for a bottle of Cheval Blanc from an ordinary vintage, availability is difficult.

Which is why I’m always grateful when The Big Guy brings a bottle of Burgundy to the house. These French wines — the red is pinot noir and the white is chardonnay — are his favorites, and we always have a terrific time marveling at how well the Burgundians put them together, and always seem to get a whole that is greater than the parts.

The Hudelot-Noellat ($60, purchased, 13%) is no exception. The producer is one of the most respected in the region, one of those family businesses that make Burgundy what it is. We tasted the about 18 months ago, and it was still young and lively, with a zingy, almost tangy fruit aroma and a wonderful burst of red fruit (strawberry, as hard as that is to believe) in the middle.

He brought another bottle over last month, and the wine had calmed down quite a bit. It’s probably ready to drink; the fruit is starting to become part of the wine, and isn’t something that stands out. It’s a wonder of oak and tannins, a lesson in how to use oak in pinot noir and how to craft tannins that give the wine structure but don’t overwhelm it.

This is an elegant, subtle wine, one that is gone before you notice what has happened, and then you wonder why there isn’t any left. It’s a reminder of just how good red Burgundy can be, and why it’s so expensive.

Expensive wine 64: Caymus Cabernet Sauvignon 2012

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Caymus cabernet sauvignon 2012The Wine Curmudgeon has a surprisingly long history with Caymus, considering how much its wines cost and that I don’t usually write about wines that cost that much. First, there was this, involving Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, as well as a big-time lunch last year when I tasted the 2003 Special Select, which someone mentioned sold for around $300 a bottle (assuming you could find it).

So I shouldn’t have been surprised when I was asked to participate in a Twitter tasting for the Caymus 2012 cabernet sauvignon ($60, sample, 14.6%), honoring the winery’s 40th anniversary. Which I agreed to do, and then had to cancel because I forgot I was judging the Critics Challenge that weekend and couldn’t do both.

Which would have been fun, because this is an intriguing wine — full of fruit and oak in a style I don’t usually like, but put together with such passion and honesty that even I can appreciate it. In fact, I tasted the wine with The Big Guy and L. Kleinpeter, and each was raving: “Intense.” “Well integrated.” “Rich and luscious.” And, perhaps the biggest compliment: Both would buy the Caymus, and these are two people who spend a lot of time drinking cheap wine with me.

The Caymus is very young, and the dark fruit (black cherry? blackberries?) practically jumps off the glass when you put your mouth over it, though it should age gracefully over the next couple of years. This is a wine loaded with sweet fruit, as these wines almost always are, but the fruit is part of the whole, and the tannins are fine and almost tasty, something that is not easy to do. In this, it is a wine that is exactly what people who appreciate Napa cabernet want, and done impeccably.

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