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Wine of the week: Bogle Pinot Noir 2013

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bogle pinot noirThe Wine Curmudgeon has probably tasted more poorly-made pinot noir than anyone in the wine business. I mention this not to elicit sympathy (tasting badly made pinot noir still beats working for a living), but to reinforce just how well made the Bogle pinot noir is, and especially for the price. It mostly tastes like pinot noir, and there aren’t many $10 pinots you can say that about.

That’s because most pinot noir that costs less than $20 bares as much resemblance to traditional pinot noir as I do to an editor at the Wine Spectator. It’s too ripe, it’s too fruity, it’s blended with too many other grapes, it’s too tannic, and it’s too alcoholic, and tastes nothing like the traditional description of pinot — elegant and refined. This doesn’t mean many of those aren’t enjoyable; they just don’t taste like pinot noir.

Which the Bogle ($10, purchased, 13.5%) does. It’s not a $100 red Burgundy or $50 Oregon pinot noir, but most of what needs to be there is there: Enough fruit (mostly black), a fresh mouthfeel, and real pinot tannins, which invigorate the wine. It’s not full of the jammy sweet fruit that most pinots at this price opt for, and it’s smooth in the way many consumers like without insulting those of us who want more than smoothness.

The oak — too obviously trying to be chocolate — could be better done, but this is another example of how much Bogle cares about cheap wine and gives those of us who want to drink it value for our money. Highly recommended, and why Bogle has been in the $10 Hall of Fame since I started it.


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Winebits 380: Wine prices edition

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wine pricesCheaper imported wine? That’s the question that many people were asking last month at a major European industry trade show, ProWein in Germany. The dollar has gained more than 20 percent against the euro in the past year, and the exchange rate is near 1-1, something that hasn’t happened in decades. This change was welcomed by many foreign producers, since it would make their wine easier to sell in the U.S. Said one Spanish winery official: “Obviously, the exchange rate is helping us very much and gives us a number of opportunities at the moment.” Whether consumers will see lower wine prices on store shelves, though, remains to be seen. Distributors and importers are reluctant to cut prices, not only because it means more profit for them if they don’t, but because the industry seems committed to the idea of premiumisation, trading U.S. consumers up to more expensive bottles of wine.

Less cheap wine? Maybe, maybe not. This story, from CNBC, is the sort of thing that makes me crazy — a reporter is given an assignment and isn’t quite sure how to do it. The story starts saying that California’s drought will make quality cheap wine more difficult to find, but soon detours into sake, wine writing, the difference between Old World and New World wines, and that drought isn’t necessarily a bad thing for grapes. Blame the editor, who was too busy or too lazy or too indifferent to offer the reporter any direction. How do I know this? The reporter quoted another reporter, which is not something you’re supposed to do. A better editor would have taken that out, with a stern warning not to do it again.

Lots of effort to little effect? Researchers say they have discovered how to successfully price wine futures, part of a disturbing trend in wine research that focuses on wine that almost no one buys but that gets a lot of attention. It’s one thing to research the futures market in corn, wheat, and pork bellies, because that determines the price of food. But wine futures? Would it matter to anyone but the Winestream Media, very rich people, and a handful of retailers if they went away tomorrow?

The second ultimate do-it-yourself wine review

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wine reviewOne of the Wine Curmudgeon’s goals, which says a lot about my perspective, is to make wine writing unnecessary. If I do a good enough of job teaching people about wine with the book, on the blog, and in the classroom, then we won’t need the Winestream Media, its indecipherable tasting notes, its fawning over wine no one can buy, and its arrogance. After that, of course, I’ll start working on world peace.

Until then, you can write your own wine review, using the handy drop-down menus in this post. Those of you who get the blog via email or on Facebook may have to go the website — click here to do so. And, if you like this one, you can go here and complete the first ultimate do-it-yourself wine review.

This wine is

It tastes

One thing I did notice:

I think the wine would pair with

I liked the wine well enough, but

I suppose I have to give it a score, so

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